Brown Lion

My wife and I are fortunate enough to own an audio copy of C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia, a series of seven books about the fictional country of Narnia. We have been listening to it together some evenings. As of this writing, we have completed six of the seven books, the most recent being The Silver Chair. Sometimes we listen to them to be entertained as we pass the time (such as on a long car trip), but I have endeavored to listen to them this time around a little more critically, paying special attention to what may be Lewis’s commentary on his theology.

One aspect that keeps coming up is his belief in God’s sovereignty. Over and over again, Aslan (the lion, and representative of Christ throughout the books) is portrayed as having a will and being in control even while some of the characters struggle or suffer. The first book, The Magician’s Nephew, has Aslan singing to create Narnia; in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe he suffers and dies to redeem a traitor; in the most recent book that we’ve listened to, Aslan wishes to bring a certain Prince Rilian back to Narnia to be its leader and sends the human children Eustace and Jill, along with a Marshwiggle named Puddleglum to find him. These three characters aren’t able to follow his instructions completely and yet persist through various trials until they are eventually successful.

Over and over, throughout the books the reader is given to understand that while Aslan might not be around, he is still in control. The characters quite often express faith in Aslan, even though they aren’t quite sure when he will manifest himself to make things better.

I have been encouraged to have a more childlike faith in the sovereignty of God through these books. God is in control, and He can do whatever He wants, when He wants. I certainly would like it if He shows up when I think I need Him. Even if His timing isn’t my own, my responsibility is to carry on with my role and leave everything else up to Him.

Consider these verses, part of a prayer from King David:

Yours, Lord, is the greatness and the power and the glory and the splendor and the majesty, for everything in the heavens and on earth belongs to you. Yours, Lord, is the kingdom, and you are exalted as head over all. Riches and honor come from you, and you are the ruler of everything. Power and might are in your hand, and it is in your hand to make great and to give strength to all. [1Ch 29:11-12 CSB]

As you enter the Sabbath, may you get peace from the knowledge that the God you serve is “head over all”…and He loves you!

Shabbat Shalom!